Trivia for Writers and Readers

trivia

Trivia
[triv-ee-uh]

Plural Noun
1.   Matters or things that are very unimportant,inconsequential, or nonessential; trifles;trivialities. 

Noun
1.   (in Roman religion) Hecate: so called because Shewas the Goddess of the crossroads.

Latin, feminine of trivius (adj.), derivative of triviumplace where three roads meet, equivalent to tri- tri- + -vium, derivative of via way, road

 British Dictionary Definitions For Trivia

 Noun
1.   (functioning as singular or pl) petty details or considerations; trifles; trivialities.

Word Origin:  From New Latin, plural of Latin trivium junction of three roads; for meaning.
-From Dictionary.com

LINE  

alphabet
Who Invented the English Alphabet?

The English language was first written in the Anglo-Saxon futhorc runic alphabet, in use from the 5th century. This alphabet was brought to what is now England, along with the proto-form of the language itself, by Anglo-Saxon settlers. Very few examples of this form of written Old English have survived, these being mostly short inscriptions or fragments.

The Latin script, introduced by Christian missionaries, began to replace the Anglo-Saxon futhorc from about the 7th century, although the two continued in parallel for some time. 

In the year 1011, a monk named Byrhtferð recorded the traditional order of the Old English alphabet.[2] He listed the 24 letters of the Latin alphabet first (including ampersand), then 5 additional English letters, starting with the Tironian note ond () an insular symbol for and:

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T V X Y Z & ⁊ Ƿ Þ Ð Æ
In the orthography of Modern English, thorn (þ), eth (ð), wynn (ƿ), yogh (ȝ), ash (æ), and ethel (œ) are obsolete. 

The letters u and j, as distinct from v and i, were introduced in the 16th century, and w assumed the status of an independent letter, so that the English alphabet is now considered to consist of the following 26 letters:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Learn more at Wikipedia LINE

 

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